Infringement Prevention Advice

INFRINGEMENT OF THE LONDON CTA BY A FLIGHT CENTRE AIRCRAFT  It is some years since a Fairoaks Flight Centre aeroplane infringed controlled airspace.  By ‘infringed’ I mean entered controlled airspace without the permission of the controlling authority. We have had such an incursion recently.  London ATC submitted a Mandatory Occurrence Report (MOR) as a result of this infringement and the investigation of the event is still ongoing by NATS and the CAA. Historically, such an infringement might have resulted in an embarrassing telephone conversation with the appropriate duty controller.  Nowadays, a Mandatory Occurrence Report (MOR) is filed by the airspace controlling authority, followed by an infringement questionnaire and then the full investigation.  NATS often produce a radar plot as evidence of the infringement. The perceived seriousness of the offence will determine the consequences of the infringement. In this particular infringement the Flight Centre aircraft flew form Fairoaks to Daventry, then to the VORs at Barkway (BKY),  Brookmans Park (BPK), Bovingdon (BNN) and back to Fairoaks.  The infringement occurred at BKY because the aircraft was at 3400ft and the CTA, which is Class D airspace, is from 2500ft to 3500ft. In addition, there are areas around Luton and Stanstead which are mandatory transponder areas. There is more to this infringement than I have summarised here but these are the salient points. This post is intended as a reminder to all to be careful with their flight planning, particularly around Luton and Stanstead.  Talk to them, they will keep you out of trouble. If you have any doubts or questions about your plan talk to an instructor. Further general information is available on the NATS website at www.nats.aero Please consider the following when you are planning to go anywhere near controlled airspace. If you are not 100% sure, or out of practice, get an instructor to go with you on a navigational exercise which includes Air Traffic Control liaison.  There are lots of places to do this around Fairoaks.  For example, given  that Fairoaks is within the London CTR get an instructor to show you how to go though the London CTR with a Special VFR. Undertake a flight with an instructor if you have not flown a Flight Centre aeroplane in the last 28 days, as required in the Flying Orders book.  If you have not reviewed this recently please do so and sign the review page. Consider how SkyDemon...
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Wet Head Championships!

International Indoor Wet Head Championships! Date: Saturday 22 February 2014 New Date: Friday 28 February 2014 Location: Fairoaks Airport Bar (F A B!) Games Commence: 1945 Hrs    Wet Head is a hilarious game of fun, skill and pure luck! Likened to Russian roulette but with a small amount of water on your head, the games will have you laughing all evening! For the championships we are mixing wet head with some general knowledge questions for all to enjoy! During the evening a sumptuous supper of chile & jacket potato will be served for £6.00 – there will be very limited ‘extra’ portions available on the night so please confirm your supper reservation ASAP. As the name suggests you may get a little damp (it really is a very small amount of water) – no special clothing is required and towels will be provided. Friends and family all welcome! To confirm your place for a fun evening of laughter, music and prizes till very late, please email...
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2014 GASCo Safety Evening

We are pleased to announce that the 2014 GASCo Safety Evening will be held at Fairoaks next week.  Thursday 13 February 2014 Time: 1930 – 2130 Location: Fairoaks Airport Bar (F A B!) GASCo delivers these safety evenings on behalf of the CAA. The evening is designed to provide you with an opportunity to reflect on General Aviation safety and understand how it affects you, the people you fly with and your clubs and associations.  Everyone, from students to experienced pilots, is encouraged to attend the evening which provides useful and up-to-date information on how to improve flight safety. In particular, the content focus this year will be on the CAA’s GA Safety Six: Airspace Infringements Airborne Conflict Loss of Control Runway Excursion Controlled Flight Into Terrain Human Factors Event Registration Attendance is free however, due to limited space available, prior notification of attendance is required. Please send your details (name and total number of people attending) to manager@flysynergy.com in advance of the evening so we can secure your place. We look forward hopefully seeing you on the evening. For those needing some extra encouragement, the Fairoaks Airport Bar (F A B!) will be open throughout!  ...
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EASA Conversion Update

In their latest news release, the CAA has reminded all pilots of the upcoming restrictions that will be placed on holders of a UK CAA ‘National’ pilots licence. Please note this is different to an NPPL (National Private Pilot’s Licence) so this may apply to you. Take a moment to think about which licence you have as you may need to take action by April 2014 in order to remain valid. How to identify your licence type. Your licence will most likely fall into one of the below categories: 1. EASA Part-FCL Licence This is the newest type of licence issued. It fits onto one page and is issued in a small blue book. Generally speaking, if you have this type of licence no further action is required as you are likely to be fully up-to-date. 2. JAR-PPL Licence  This will be the most likely licence for those who first gained their licence after 2000, following the introduction of the Joint Aviation Regulations. It is characterised by a 5 year validity period. If you have this type of licence, you only need to covert over to a new EASA licence when either your existing one expires or an amedment such as adding a new rating is made. 3. UK CAA ‘National’ Licence These licences are those which were issued before the introduction of JAR-PPL licences around 2000. They are characterised by having a lifetime validity. It it these licences which are the subject of this article. 4. National Private Pilot’s Licence  A UK-only licence that is normally issued alongside a medical declaration rather than a Class 1 / 2 medical. If you hold an NPPL, you will be required to convert this to the European equivalent which is an LAPL (Light Aircraft Pilot’s Licence) by April 2015 in order to continue flying EASA aircraft (includes C152 and PA28). More information will follow on this process in due course. What’s Happening?  If you are the holder of a UK CAA ‘National’ Licence, then your licence will no longer be valid for flying EASA aircraft from 8 April 2015 onwards. C152s and PA28s are included in the definition of EASA aircarft. In order to continue flying such aircraft beyond 8 April 2015, you will need to have converted over to an EASA Part-FCL licence.  Even before this date however there are further restrictions to be aware of that begin on 8 April 2014....
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Taxiing Restrictions

Outside B1 Hangar Attention is drawn to the following extract from the Fairoaks AIP (EGTF AD 2.20, 2b): “The apron in front of the B1 hangar is not available for taxiing aircraft due to surface condition.” Due to the loose stones outside the main hangars at Fairoaks, no aircraft should taxi or have the engine running behind the white line. This area is depicted on the image below with the shaded red area. In practice, this means that when starting aircraft parked outside the hangar, they must be pushed forward in front of the white line and started from that position. When parking, aircraft should be shut down in front of the white line and then pushed backwards onto the applicable parking spot. Always ensure there are two people available when manoeuvring aircraft in this way. If assistance is needed, please seek either the ground crew, an instructor or member of staff. Taxiway Charlie Similarly, taxiway Charlie is NOT to be used owing to unsuitable surface conditions. This restriction, whist not set by the airport as in the case above, is a club rule which has been made in order to sensibly mitigate the risk of any propellor damage. As a result, the tower may at times request you taxi via TWY Charlie. If requested to do so, the appropriate response should be “Unable to accept taxiway Charlie due to surface condition, G-CD.” They will then be able to offer an alternative routing as required.  ...
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